Monday, February 10, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #17


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour concludes at Sir Read-A-Lot, where it received a nice review! Stuart said:


This is a boy's own adventure that will keep you interested from beginning to end.  I know little about the life and times of Charlemagne but found myself looking him up and finding out more about this most fascinating character. 

This independent novel is a solid debut for Colonel George Steger and I look forward to the next volume in the series.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #16


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour continues at Reading the Ages, where it received a lovely review! Kathleen said:

George Steger has crafted a fine piece of work as a first novel, and he enjoys as well as develops his character . . . He is a top notch medieval scholar, as the descriptions of 8th century fortifications as well as agricultural developments of the times are superb.

I personally am looking forward to the next installment in Sebastian's life and recommend this for historical  and medieval novel fans.

The tour comes to its conclusion today with a review at Sir Read-a-Lot.


Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #15


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour continues at Cynthia Robertson, Writer with a giveaway! 

In a dark age of unending war and violence, one young warrior opposes a mighty king to forge a new path to peace…

During the savage Frankish-Saxon wars, the moving force of his age, Karl der Grosse, King Charlemagne, fights and rules like the pagan enemies he seeks to conquer. But in the long shadow of war and genocide, a spark of enlightenment grows, and the king turns to learned men to help him lead his empire to prosperity.

One of these men is the unlikely young warrior Sebastian. Raised in an isolated fortress on the wild Saxon border, Sebastian balances his time in the training yard with hours teaching himself to read, seeking answers to the great mysteries of life during an age when such pastimes were scorned by fighting men. Sebastian’s unique combination of skills endears him to Charlemagne and to the ladies of the king’s court, though the only woman to hold his heart is forbidden to him. As the king determines to surround himself with men who can both fight and think beyond the fighting, Sebastian becomes one of the privileged few to hold the king’s ear.

But the favor of the king does not come without a cost. As Charlemagne’s vassals grapple for power, there are some who will do anything to see Sebastian fall from grace, including his ruthless cousin Konrad, whose hatred and jealousy threaten to destroy everything Sebastian holds dear. And as Sebastian increasingly finds himself at odds with the king’s brutal methods of domination and vengeance, his ingrained sense of honor and integrity lead him to the edge of treason, perilously pitting himself against the most powerful man of his age.

This fast-paced adventure story brings Charlemagne’s realm to life as the vicious Christian-pagan wars of the eighth century decide the fate of Europe. Filled with action, intrigue, and romance, Sebastian’s Way is a riveting and colorful recreation of the world of Europe’s greatest medieval monarch.

Click here to enter to win a copy of Sebastian's Way.
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The tour continues today with reviews at Sir Read-a-Lot and Reading the Ages.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #14


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour continues at Jorie Loves a Story with an interview! Jorie asks:

What impressed you the most in your research of Sebastian? And, what did you take away with you from those readings? And is Sebastian a fictional account of another man’s life? Or, did he truly live?

In researching for the book I was impressed by what Charlemagne accomplished during his long reign. He unified most of Europe and gave it an identity. He made Rome secure from its enemies and empowered the pope so that he could stand up to the emperor in Constantinople, who was his theological and doctrinal rival. He was the architect of the strongest breath of cultural reawakening since the fall of the Roman Empire and presided over a period of art, architecture and learning that was so impressive that it has been dubbed “the Carolingian Renaissance.” Just one little example from that renewal is the Carolingian miniscule, which featured punctuation and spaces between words, a revolutionary change that made Latin the lingua franca of Europe for centuries more and advanced literacy dramatically.

Finally, the unification of Europe under Charlemagne provided a model that is still pursued by the present-day European Union. It is why the annual EU award for the best contribution to unity in Europe is called The Charlemagne Prize . . .

Click here to read the full interview.
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The tour continues tomorrow with reviews at Cynthia Robertson, Writer and Reading the Ages.

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #13


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour continues at Jorie Loves a Story, where it received an in-depth review! Jorie said:

I appreciated getting into the internal mind of the characters, both major and minor combined, as it allowed me to step through an invisible time portal. Given the distance is greater than 1,200 years between then and now, it’s the descriptive nature of Steger’s writing which gave the visceral experience more depth in meaning! Steger has blissfully launched himself on a platform of quality story-telling interspersed with bang-on brilliant dialogue and narrative!

Click here to read the full review.
Click here to view the tour schedule.

The tour continues tomorrow at Jorie Loves a Story with an interview.


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #12


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour stops at HF Connection with a guest post!

The Trouble with the Women

Writers are always warned not to project onto the past the rationality, attitudes, and customs of the present. Writers who do so are disingenuous and at risk of exposure. Nevertheless, observing that rule can be a severe handicap. So it was for me. 

You see, over my lifetime, I was lucky to have been close to some very strong women who wielded a great deal of influence and made a significant difference in my life, and I wanted to use my experience of them in the book. The problem, however, was the same that it has been throughout most of history up to the modern era: women do not show up so well or as often in history as men do. And the farther back in history one goes, the worse it gets. That seemed especially true when I began to write about the eighth-century world of Charlemagne. 

A popular philosophical view of women in that era was that they were innately weak and soft, unable to learn complexities, reason well, or control their sexual urges. Therefore they were subordinate to men. What is commonly known is that prostitution and concubinage were common and the double standard prevailed in the household. Unions of limited duration were recognized, and a man could divorce his wife for bad conduct (the particulars of such accusation being provided by the husband.) As for education for women, there wasn’t much available outside of convents, and that life was largely for widows, women wanting to escape a dreaded marriage, or those who were being discarded by their husbands. At the convent, it was possible for a woman to learn, but the fruit of her learning rarely had impact outside the cloister. 

Not much of that fit what I wanted the women of Sebastian’s Way to be.

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The tour continues tomorrow with a review at Jorie Loves a Story.


Monday, February 3, 2014

Sebastian's Way Blog Tour Stop #11


Today the Sebastian's Way blog tour continues at Closed the Cover, where it received an excellent review! The reviewer said:

A heavy story arc with challenging depth Steger manages to write an incredible historical epic without weighing it down with unnecessary details or complex medieval politics.  The medieval historical fiction genre is a very specific and, sometimes, overwhelming era but Steger writes about it beautifully; fans of this historical era will love Sebastian’s Way . . . It’s a fast-paced tale of love, honor, intrigue, romance and the allegorical war of brute strength versus high intellect.  It’s a thrilling story and one worth reading.


Click here to read the full review.
Click here to view the tour schedule.

The tour continues tomorrow with a guest post at HF Connection.